Songs You May Have Missed #514

royksopp

Röyksopp: “Remind Me” (2001)

If you don’t know Norwegian duo Röyksopp but their collaboration with Erlend Øye  (of another Norwegian duo, Kings of Convenience) sounds familiar, it’s probably thanks to a certain Geico TV ad (see below). Known throughout…um, Scandinavia at least, for their lush downbeat electronica, they pop their heads up into a realm of greater notoriety on occasions such as the aforementioned commercial–or their recent collaboration with Swedish dance diva Robyn.

See also: http://edcyphers.com/2013/08/11/songs-you-may-have-missed-461/

See also: http://edcyphers.com/2013/11/12/recommended-albums-57/

Video of the Week: 99 Red Balloons – Played with Red Balloons

What’s Lost When the Cloud Replaces CDs

cloud

(via The New Yorker)

by Alex Ross

Recently, while moving my CD collection to new shelving, I struggled with feelings of obsolescence and futility. Why bother with space-devouring, planet-harming plastic objects when so much music can be had at the touch of a trackpad—on Spotify, Pandora, Beats Music, and other streaming services that rain sonic data from the virtual entity known as the Cloud? What is the point of having amassed, say, the complete symphonies of the Estonian composer Eduard Tubin (1905-82) when all eleven of them pop up on Spotify, albeit in random order? (When I searched for “Tubin” on the service, I was offered two movements of his Fourth Symphony, with the others appearing far down a list.) The tide has turned against the collector of recordings, not to mention the collector of books: what was once known as building a library is now considered hoarding. One is expected to banish all clutter and consume culture in a gleaming, empty room…

Read More: http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2014/09/08/classical-cloud

Hooked on a Feeling: Inside the Hit ‘Guardians of the Galaxy’ Soundtrack

quill

(via Rolling Stone)

by Kory Grow

By | September 3, 2014

When Guardians of the Galaxy director James Gunn began assembling the soundtrack for his Marvel superhero flick, he wanted familiar hits but not overplayed radio staples. In the movie, now officially the biggest film of the year, these songs would connect lead character Peter “Star-Lord” Quill – who was abducted by aliens just after his mother’s death in 1988 – to his old life and the era his mother grew up in.

“The tape is really the character of Quill’s mother,” Gunn tells Rolling Stone. “The Walkman and the compilation tape inside of it is the heart of the film.”

As he worked, the director compiled a playlist of tunes, most from the Seventies, that he thought the character would have liked. David Bowie, the Runaways and the Jackson 5 all make appearances, complemented by tracks from lesser known acts like the Raspberries (“Go All the Way”) and Blue Swede (“Hooked on a Feeling”). “I think most of the songs, although slight hits, never truly had their day in the sun,” Gunn says. “That time is now. I also think people are hungry for good, old-fashioned, well-crafted pop songs that exist outside of any sort of imposed hipness or irony.”

It turns out, he was onto something. A week after its release, Guardians of the Galaxy: Awesome Mix Vol. 1 topped the album charts, becoming the first soundtrack ever to do so without having a single original song…

Read more: http://www.rollingstone.com/music/features/inside-guardians-of-the-galaxy-soundtrack-20140903?utm_source=regular&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=newsletter&email=soundslikefundjs%40hotmail.com

Why do we Love the Music we Heard as Teenagers?

memory

(via Slate)

by Mark Joseph Stern

As I plod through my 20s, I’ve noticed a strange phenomenon: The music I loved as a teenager means more to me than ever—but with each passing year, the new songs on the radio sound like noisy nonsense. On an objective level, I know this makes no sense. I cannot seriously assert that Ludacris’ “Rollout” is artistically superior to Katy Perry’s “Roar,” yet I treasure every second of the former and reject the latter as yelping pablum. If I listen to the Top 10 hits of 2013, I get a headache. If I listen to the Top 10 hits of 2003, I get happy.

Why do the songs I heard when I was teenager sound sweeter than anything I listen to as an adult? I’m happy to report that my own failures of discernment as a music critic may not be entirely to blame…

Read more:

http://www.slate.com/articles/health_and_science/science/2014/08/musical_nostalgia_the_psychology_and_neuroscience_for_song_preference_and.html?wpsrc=sh_all_dt_tw_ru

Video of the Week: Robert Reed Takes One-Man-Band Approach on New Album

Robert Reed’s video of a musical excerpt from his new Sanctuary album is not only an unmistakable display of the man’s broad musical competence, but also a pointed demonstration that even when music sounds fairly straightforward there are often more ingredients in the recipe than we realize.

Video of the Week: Josh Ritter–Love is Making its Way Back Home

Director by Erez Horovitz and about twenty artists, editors, and assistants photographed the more than 12,000 laser-cut construction paper cutouts which comprise the four-minute animated video which accompanies Josh Ritter’s “Love is Making its Way Back Home”.

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