Songs You May Have Missed #675

Graffiti6: “Under the Mask” (2014)

You’d swear this prescient pop tune was released in April of 2020 and not April of 2014:

I see your light
I see your light
No matter where you turn
Or where you hide
I see it all
Shining so bright
You say that you’re not sure
And there’s no cure
But there’s a way
To fly away

There is a light, there is a light in your heart
There is a light burning a fire in the dark
Under the mask, under the mask we’re beautiful
So let out the light, no need to hide anymore
Under the mask

There is a space
There is a space
Somewhere that you belong
It keeps you strong
It’s in my arms
‘Cause it is your space
No matter where we turn
Or where we hide
We’ll fly away
So fly away

There is a light, there is a light in your heart
There is a light burning a fire in the dark
Under the mask, under the mask we’re beautiful
So let out the light, no need to hide anymore

Don’t turn away
Don’t hide away darling
Don’t turn away
Don’t hide away
I see you under the mask
Under the mask

There is a light, there is a light in your heart
There is a light burning a fire in the dark
Under the mask, under the mask we’re beautiful
So let out the light, no need to hide anymore
Under the mask

There is a light, there is a light in your heart
There is a light burning a fire in the dark
Under the mask, under the mask we’re beautiful
So let out the light, no need to hide anymore

See also: Songs You May Have Missed #194 | Every Moment Has A Song (edcyphers.com)

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Songs You May Have Missed #674

Venice: “The Family Tree” (1999)

Venice are the Eagles you’ve never heard of.

Comprised of two brothers and their two cousins (also brothers) from–where else–Venice California, the band have been dubbed by David Crosby “the best vocal group in America”.

The list of superstars with whom they’ve performed or recorded is considerable (deep breath): Elton John, Don Henley, Bruce Springsteen, Warren Zevon, Sting, Heart, Phil Collins, Linda Ronstadt, Dolly Parton, Cher, Styx, Brian Wilson, The Beach Boys, Melissa Etheridge, The Doobie Brothers, Kenny Loggins, Dave Mason, Michael McDonald, Bon Jovi, Chris Isaac, Jackson Browne, Stevie Nicks, Ozzy Osbourne, David Crosby, and Billy Idol among others.

For all that, the Californis band’s biggest success has been in the Netherlands, where in 2003 they won that country’s Grammy-equivalent Edison Award for Best International Artist, besting such heavyweights as Coldplay and U2, and where they enjoy consistent radio play and sold-out tours.

Band members also contributed backing vocals on Roger Waters “The Wall Live Tour” from 2010-13.

The poignant “The Family Tree” shows off the meshing of the familial harmonies as the lyrics touch on the topic of the family surviving down the years, something this family band is certainly testament to.

See also: Video of the Week: Skunk Baxter Covers ‘Rikki Don’t Lose That Number’ | Every Moment Has A Song (edcyphers.com)

On a Lighter Note…

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A Picture’s Worth a Thousand Words: Stories Behind Iconic Album Covers

Source: Amazon / Photo by Dezo Hoffman, Shutterstock

(via musicoholics)

Rubber Soul, The Beatles (1965)

Photographer Robert Freeman snapped the picture of the band in John Lennon’s garden. The stretched effect was actually a mistake made while the band was looking at Robert’s samples. He projected the image onto a cardboard cutout, but when the cardboard fell backwards, the image became stretched. The band ended up loving the image and felt like it was a perfect depiction of their new sound.

The album’s typography was designed by Charles Front. He used the title as inspiration and created a typeface style that was used for psychedelic and flower-power designs. Charles also added another hidden element to his lettering. The title reads “Road Abbey” if you hold the album upside down in front of a mirror…

Read more: A Picture’s Worth a Thousand Words: Stories Behind Iconic Album Covers – page 3 of 36 – Musicoholics

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Jethro Tull’s Ian Anderson: My Life in 10 Songs

As the pioneering prog rockers celebrate their 50th anniversary with a tour and new box set, their leader reflects on the tracks that defined them

(via Rolling Stone) by Kory Grow

For Ian Anderson – prog rocker extraordinaire and the world’s best one-legged-stance flautist, bar none – a half-century career in music is no remarkable feat. “It’s not any particularly novel or unusual occurrence,” the Jethro Tull leader says nonchalantly through his dry British accent. “This year marks the anniversary of many other bands who did things around the same period of time. King Crimson started in 1968. So did Yes, Rush and Deep Purple. And of course it’s Led Zeppelin’s 50th anniversary too. So there we go.”

But what he fails to acknowledge is that none of those bands, no matter how out-there they got, were able to blend their hard-rock aspirations with the same levels of pomp, guile or unapologetic pretension as Jethro Tull. None scored FM-radio gold singing lyrics like “Lend me your ear while I call you a fool” (“The Witch’s Promise”) or by writing a 44-minute, tongue-in-cheek prog-rock song (“Thick as a Brick,” presented in two parts on the original LP and packaged in a fake newspaper) or by playing frilly flute solos over Renaissance-inspired folk-rock (“Songs From the Wood”).

In their 50 years, Jethro Tull have notched an astounding 15 gold or platinum albums in the U.S., as well as two Number One LPs. Their most famous song, “Aqualung,” has a guitar riff that’s as cutting and memorable as “Iron Man” and “Smoke on the Water,” and their music has influenced Black Sabbath, Iron Maiden, Porcupine Tree, Pearl Jam and Nick Cave, among others. Yet the band has not yet been inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, and the only time it has won a Grammy was in the Hard Rock/Metal category – a concept that seemed so preposterous to Anderson that he didn’t bother to show up…

Read more: Jethro Tull’s Ian Anderson: My Life in 10 Songs – Rolling Stone

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