The Coming Death of Just About Every Rock Legend

(via The Week) by Damon Linker August 31, 2019

Rock music isn’t dead, but it’s barely hanging on.

This is true in at least two senses.

Though popular music sales in general have plummeted since their peak around the turn of the millennium, certain genres continue to generate commercial excitement: pop, rap, hip-hop, country. But rock — amplified and often distorted electric guitars, bass, drums, melodic if frequently abrasive lead vocals, with songs usually penned exclusively by the members of the band — barely registers on the charts. There are still important rock musicians making music in a range of styles — Canada’s Big Wreck excels at sophisticated progressive hard rock, for example, while the more subdued American band Dawes artfully expands on the soulful songwriting that thrived in California during the 1970s. But these groups often toil in relative obscurity, selling a few thousand records at a time, performing to modest-sized crowds in clubs and theaters…

Read more: https://theweek.com/articles/861750/coming-death-just-about-every-rock-legend

Baby Hold On: Why Eddie Money Was the Patron Saint of Rock Uncool

CIRCA 1985: Eddie Money poses for a portrait circa 1985. (Photo by Richard McCaffrey/Michael Ochs Archive/Getty Images)

(via Rolling Stone) by David Browne

As he himself would have admitted, Eddie Money was no one’s idea of a conventional rock star. His stage moves were always a little gawky and spasmodic, his borderline hoarse voice in need of a lozenge or two. Emerging during the punk era though never part of it, he preferred the stadium-friendly shout-along choruses of mainstream rock and adopted the suit-and-tie New Wave look while keeping his hair unfashionably long. He was even an NYPD cop — a career move that, while utterly honorable, didn’t jibe with the traditional, anti-establishment rock & roll handbook...

Read more: https://www.rollingstone.com/music/music-features/eddie-money-appreciation-884179/

 

Songs You May Have Missed #642

Hollywood Vampires: “Welcome to Bushwackers” (2019)

Hollywood Vampires are an Alice Cooper-fronted side project that also features Joe Perry and Johnny Depp.

Their first album’s guest list reads like a debauched Hollywood rock ‘n roll party, which in a sense it was. Paul McCartney, Slash, Joe Walsh, Robby Krieger, Kip Winger, Dave Grohl, Perry Farrell and Brian Johnson all contributed to an album that mainly featured covers from the days when Cooper stalked SoCal with another group of musicians, also dubbed the Hollywood Vampires. That merry band included John Lennon, Harry Nilsson, Keith Moon, Ringo Starr and Mickey Dolenz and their antics were legendary, as you might expect from any merry band containing two drummers.

This Hollywood Vampires is an actual band, and not only do they rock, but they’re aptly named. Alice of course is the king of theatrical rock. And though Johnny Depp might not be a name that would come to mind if you were forming a supergroup, his own theatrical tendencies actually make sense in the context of a band fronted by a guy whose best work always conjured a visual element.

“Welcome to Bushwackers”, from their second release, features yet another guest superstar, Jeff Beck.

The Muse Behind the Music: Meet the People Who Inspired Some of the Best Songs in History

Sometimes we are so moved by our favorite songs that we feel as though the lyrics were written especially for us. Unfortunately, in reality, you are one of a million that feels that way. But that is what makes a good song; when audiences across the world deeply identify with its message. This notion raises the question; how were some of the most successful musicians able to write songs so relatable and meaningful? What happened in their own lives that pulled on their heartstrings and inspired them to write those poetic lyrics that so deeply speak to the masses.

As you may have guessed, most of these songs do actually have real life backstories, and many times the inspiration behind the lyrics are people that have somehow influenced the artist’s lives. These people might be old girlfriends, personal heroes, or random chance encounters. Here are the inspirations behind some of the most beautiful songs today. You might just recognize some of these names…

Read more: https://populareverything.com/the-muse-behind-the-music-meet-the-people-who-inspired-the-best-songs-in-history/?utm_source=fb&utm_medium=pix&utm_campaign=songinspration_A2_ZS&fbclid=IwAR2JllsPgn8I9uD2PFFhUeaCY29x2XD9xm4E2bi2f5JLJfN6dNIeOdU0tX4

 

Quora: What Beatles song do you think was the pinnacle of their career and why?

(via Quora) Written by Mark Anater

For most bands this is an easy question. It’s their first hit, or their biggest hit, the one that gets the most airplay on radio or the most downloads. If you know that song, you pretty well know the band. For the Rolling Stones it’s Satisfaction. For the Who it’s My Generation. For Led Zeppelin it’s Stairway to Heaven.

But for the Beatles it’s not so easy. Maybe it’s I Want to Hold Your Hand, which started Beatlemania in the US and most of the rest of the world. Maybe it’s Yesterday, the first indication that they had larger artistic ambitions. Maybe it’s Strawberry Fields Forever, startlingly innovative and a huge departure from their previous sound…

Read more: https://www.quora.com/What-Beatles-song-do-you-think-was-the-pinnacle-of-their-career-and-why

 

The Other ’69 Music Festival

Procol Harum at the Atlantic City Pop Festival in August 1969. PeterStupar.com

By Jonathan Takiff FOR THE PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER

ifty years ago this August, tens of thousands flocked to a makeshift concert site for three days of peace, love, and their new music. Uh-oh, is this another story about the Woodstock Art and Music Festival turning 50?

Not really.

We’re talking about the Atlantic City Pop Festival, a smaller but significant gathering of the hippie tribes at the Atlantic City Race Track in Mays Landing, N.J., held Aug. 1-3, 1969. An event that predated that infamous Upstate New York festival by two weeks and arguably influenced how the latter would come to pass and be remembered.

But A.C. Pop is rarely noted in the same breath as Woodstock…

Read more: https://digital.olivesoftware.com/Olive/ODN/PhiladelphiaInquirerNJ/shared/ShowArticle.aspx?doc=PHQN%2F2019%2F07%2F28&entity=Ar06900&sk=C0B586C7&mode=text#

 

Video of the Week: Rock Family Tree–The Prog Rock Years

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