Unpopular Opinion: Prince Lowered the Bar for Sexual Innuendo in Music

While I can appreciate a titillating suggestive lyric in a pop song, I believe even the low-minded can be artfully rendered. And I’d argue that the man most associated with lyrical sexual innuendo was hardly its most literate or proficient practitioner.

Prolific? I’ll give him that. It’s almost be simpler to name the Prince songs that don’t feature bawdy double entendre than it is to give examples of his, uh…dirty mind. I won’t bother.

Popular? A hundred million sold, as McDonald’s used to say.

I’m just here to say he sucked at it.

So if you think

Cream
Get on top
Cream
You will cop
Cream
Don’t you stop
Cream
Sh-boogie bop

…is as high-minded as lowbrow gets, I’ll see your Purple One and raise you one Ian Anderson, front man of English art rockers Jethro Tull.

Singer-songwriter-flutist-guitarist and all around mischief maker Anderson rose to the occasion when it came to penning innuendo-laced lyrics, then set them in some of the most ambitiously ornate musical arrangements you’ll hear.

If his mind was in the gutter, his oldfangled English was strictly front parlor. His command of the language turned innuendo into high art. Check out “Hunting Girl” from 1977’s Songs from the Wood:

‘We found it rolled up in a tube’: Alice Cooper Discovers Warhol Classic after 40 years

Photo courtesy of Alice Cooper

(via The Guardian) by Edward Helmore

The rock star Alice Cooper has found an Andy Warhol masterpiece that could be worth millions “rolled up in a tube” in a storage locker, where it lay forgotten for more than 40 years.

The work in question is a red Little Electric Chair silkscreen, from Warhol’s Death and Disaster series. Never stretched on a frame, it sat in storage alongside touring artefacts including an electric chair that Cooper used in the early 70s as part of his ghoulish stage show.

According to Shep Gordon, the singer’s longtime manager, Cooper and Warhol became friends at the famous Max’s Kansas City venue in New York City…

Read more: https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2017/jul/24/alice-cooper-andy-warhol-little-electric-chair

Photograph courtesy Bob Gruen

Quora: Who is Bungalow Bill in that Beatles song?

(via Quora) Answered by Jon Pennington

The real life inspiration for Bungalow Bill was a 27-year-old American man named Richard A. Cooke III (known as “Rik” for short). In 1968, Rik was in Rishikesh visiting his mother, Nancy Cooke de Herrera, a publicist for the Maharishi Mahesh Yogi. As the Maharishi’s publicist, Nancy would also serve as a liaison between the Maharishi and the Beatles, while the Beatles were learning Transcendental Meditation.

The actress Mia Farrow described Nancy’s arrival at the Maharishi’s ashram as follows:

A self-important middle-aged American woman arrived, moving a mountain of luggage into the brand-new private bungalow next to Maharishi’s…People fled this newcomer and no one was sorry when she left the ashram after a short time to go tiger hunting.

I can’t quite get a read on what the original motivation was for the tiger hunt. Some depictions I’ve read portray Nancy and Rik as two socialites who blithely jaunted off to go safari while in the middle of a shallow spiritual quest. Other depictions I’ve read say that an Indian guide, Avi Kohli, encouraged Rik to kill the tiger, because the tiger was endangering some elephants and might have even endangered some villagers too…

Read more: https://www.quora.com/Who-is-Bungalow-Bill-in-that-Beatles-song

Woody Guthrie’s New Year’s Rulins

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Quora: What do you think of McCartney’s bass playing in Harrison’s “Something”? It seems to get mixed reviews.

(via (Quora) Answered by Jake Gerber, Musical Session Player

Put more succinctly : his playing is friggin BRILLIANT !!! I wish I was getting paid for this answer. In any event … I’ll commence with this. Anyone that doesn’t believe Paul put everything he had into Georges songs is mistaken. Paul took great pride in respect to everything he played. He upped the ante on three of George’s songs I can think of, two of which are on Abbey Road, the third on Revolver…

Paul’s playing on “ Something “ could be studied in a music theory class in university level. The first time you hear the song played through a proper playback system ( vinyl ) where you can actually hear the bass, you might think Paul was overplaying, there’s a lot of movement going on, and the songs a ballad which in popular music are rather restrained in respect to the bass lines, if indeed it even actually has a dedicated bass line per se…

Read more: https://www.quora.com/What-do-you-think-of-McCartneys-bass-playing-in-Harrisons-Something-It-seems-to-get-mixed-reviews

Reduce Your Stress With the Ten Most Relaxing Songs On Earth

(via fast company) By Melanie Curtin

Everyone knows they need to manage their stress. When things get difficult at work, school, or in your personal life, you can use as many tips, tricks, and techniques as you can get to calm your nerves.

So, here’s a science-backed one: make a playlist of the 10 songs found to be the most relaxing on earth…

Read more: https://www.fastcompany.com/90274251/song-reduces-anxiety-neuroscience

A brief history of why artists are no longer making a living making music

(via Roots Music Canada) by Ian Tamblyn

Today’s column from veteran Canadian singer-songwriter Ian Tamblyn is adapted from a speech he gave at a symposium at Trent University.  It’s a long read, but we decided to post it here all at once it its entirety because, well, it’s just that good. 

I would like to begin this talk on the future of “popular” music with a few cautionary notes about our ability to see into the future clearly. The fact is, it would appear we are not very good at it. Somewhere back in our Savannah DNA, we got very good at reacting to danger when it presented itself — say a lion or tiger. However, it seems we are less capable of looking ahead to avoid danger. In other words, we are a reactive rather than proactive animal. The contemporary analogy in relation to climate change is that we are similar to the frog in a pot of hot water who does not have the sensors to recognize the increasing temperature and the fact that he should get out of the boiling pot.

Yes, there have been a handful of futurists – H.G Wells, Aldous Huxley, and given the state of many current governments I would grudgingly include Ayn Rand. Probably the most successful futurists in our lifetime may have been Marshall McLuhan and Stanley Kubrick, but even so, all of these writers and film makers have been only partially successful gazing into the crystal ball. Given that the past is no more fixed than the future I begin this conversation with you.

What I hope to discuss in this time with you is the relationship between technology, the gift of music and the commodification of that gift and how that gift and the commodification of the gift has been eroded in the digital age, and as I see it, could continue to be eroded well into the 21st century…

Read more: https://www.rootsmusic.ca/2019/03/14/a-brief-history-of-why-artists-are-no-longer-making-a-living-making-music/

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