2008 Universal Studios fire destroyed up to 500,000 original master recordings, according to magazine report


(Gary Friedman/Los Angeles Times)

(via Los Angeles Daily News Business) by City News Service

SANTA MONICA — The Universal Music Group is pushing back on a New York Times Magazine report that, contrary to official statements made more than a decade ago, a 2008 fire at Universal Studios Hollywood destroyed a staggering number of original master recordings stored there.

The devastation, which company executives downplayed or dismissed outright after the fire was extinguished 11 years ago this month, is breathtaking in scope, amounting to what the new report describes as “the biggest disaster in the history of the music industry.”

Read more: https://www.dailynews.com/2019/06/12/2008-universal-studios-fire-destroyed-up-to-500000-original-master-recordings-according-to-magazine-report/

(AP Photo/Ric Francis, file)

Quora: Was Bob Dylan jealous of the mass appeal of the Beatles? (Part 2)

(via Quora) Written by Tony Sienzent

While I agree that Dylan was a restless artist following his own muse, there is no denying that he was totally captivated by The Beatles breakthrough hits in America, listening attentively to “I Want To Hold Your Hand” & “She Loves You (Yeah Yeah Yeah).”

Even though most of his purist folkie friends at Gerde’s Folk City club & The Gaslight & similar locations held their noses at this seemingly meaningless teenie-pop, with the exception of Roger McGuinn who went on to form the ‘American Beatles’ band The Byrds, Dylan privately said that The Beatles harmonies were outrageous & their chords made it all valid. He was very attentive & interested in the Beatlemania phenomena & resisted meeting them until Time Magazine gave him a cover, as they did The Beatles previously, so he would be accepted as an equal (and/or better)…

Read more: https://qr.ae/TWGQA4

Quora: Was Bob Dylan jealous of the mass appeal of the Beatles?

(via Quora) Written by Todd Lowry

Yes, Dylan was jealous of the Beatles.

Paul McCartney discovered Bob Dylan’s 1963 “Freewheelin’” album in 1964. All the Beatles had listened to it and it had inspired John and Paul to try writing deeper, more meaningful lyrics. John began by working on a new song called “I’m a Loser.”

In 1964, Dylan met the Beatles at the Delmonico Hotel in New York City. Within minutes of meeting each other, Dylan proceeded to get the Fab Four stoned for the first time on pot.

Dylan’s lyrics had inspired Lennon and McCartney to begin writing “deeper” songs such as “Norwegian Wood” and “Eleanor Rigby.”

Read more: https://www.quora.com/Was-Bob-Dylan-jealous-of-the-mass-appeal-of-the-Beatles

After 20 years, the Rolling Stones have Given up the Rights to Bittersweet Symphony

(via CNN) by Amy Woodyatt and Julia Hollingsworth

t’s one of the biggest indie rock songs of all time — and for 20 years British band The Verve didn’t make a cent off “Bitter Sweet Symphony.”

But lead singer Richard Ashcroft will finally get royalties for the track after a long-running copyright dispute with the Rolling Stones.

Read more: https://www.msn.com/en-us/music/news/the-verves-richard-ashcroft-finally-secures-bitter-sweet-symphony-royalties/ar-AABQILI

On Music…

The Best-Selling Musicians of All Time (By US Album Sales)

(via work+money) by Sam Boykin

To detail the best-selling musicians of all time by album sales, it’s helpful to first take a look at the music business — which isn’t what it used to be.

Long gone are the days when an artist could put out an album or CD and fans would rush to the store to buy a copy — and obsessively study the artwork and liner notes. That model, much to the chagrin of many musicians, ended in the late 1990s with the advent of streaming services that enabled people to download individual songs for free or a nominal price. While common now, this was a big deal at the time.

If you’re too young to remember this cultural milestone, Google “Napster and Metallica.” The heavy metal band’s drummer, Lars Ulrich, led the charge against Napster, a pioneering file-sharing internet service that allowed people to share digital musical files for free. Metallica sued Napster in 2000, alleging copyright infringement and racketeering. For a while, Ulrich became the much-maligned poster boy for greedy rock stars, but the courts ruled in Metallica’s favor and Napster eventually filed bankruptcy.

But by then the genie was out of the bottle.

Other file sharing services popped up and today people consume and download music, videos, and other media through iTunes and a host of other companies. This has caused album sales to plummet. But on the other hand, a tween without any album sales or experience performing live can now put out a music video or song and become an instant star (We’re looking at you, Justin Beiber).

Indeed, the musical landscape is vastly different from the heydays of the 1970s, ‘80s and ‘90s, when vinyl and CD sales peaked. This helps explain why the best-selling artists, as outlined below according to the Recording Industry Association of America’s certified US album sales, all rose to prominence decades ago. But even as musical tastes and styles have changed, these acts have remained popular across multiple generations.

The following are the best-selling artists of all time…

Read more: https://www.workandmoney.com/s/best-selling-musicians-of-all-time-4c35a96646914411?utm_campaign=bestsellingmusicians-075cf01d35d149fa&utm_medium=cpc&utm_source=fac&utm_content=641157

Quora: Why did George Martin make the Beatles rerecord “Please Please Me”?

(via Quora) Written by Matthew Russell

At the very early stage in their career that the Beatles wrote Please Please Me, Martin was very much the one holding all the cards. As the head of the label they were newly signed to and their producer, Martin was the one with the final say on what the band did in the studio, and he still needed to hear something special to convince him that the band were songwriters of the calibre they claimed- or at least aspired- to be. Martin and Parlophone were quite keen to have the band release How Do You Do It, written by songwriter Mitch Murray and later a number one hit for fellow “Merseybeat” act Gerry and the Pacemakers.

The Beatles hated the song (you can see why- they thought it was simplistic and a little old fashioned, and thought it would damage their credibility) but obligingly recorded it. Knowing that they needed to come up with something better in order to keep Parlophone from opting to release How Do You Do It likely spurred Lennon and McCartney on to work harder on their original material…

Read more: https://www.quora.com/Why-did-George-Martin-make-the-Beatles-rerecord-Please-Please-Me

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