Chrysalis Orchestra: Rock Re-imagined

Rock like you’ve never heard it before.
An orchestra like you’ve never seen before.
An event like you’ve never experienced before.

Introducing Chrysalis Orchestra- a brand new concept in entertainment brought to you by the legendary Terry Ellis, music visionary and co-founder of Chrysalis Records.

Imagine the greatest rock anthems of all time performed with all the power and magnificence of a complete symphony orchestra. But this is not a typical orchestra with musicians sitting pinned behind their music stands. Instead, it’s a forty piece “rock band” with young musicians, each one a virtuoso on his or her instrument, and each one a great performer, on their feet, interacting with the audience.

In its look, its sound, and in every other way, Chrysalis Orchestra is a big show, with dynamic and powerful performances that will get the audience out of their seats. There are no vocalists or electric guitars – it’s an orchestra playing reinterpretations of the rock songs we all know and love, in tribute to the great composers of the rock era. Rather than the music of Mozart and Beethoven, it presents the familiar compositions of Page and Plant, Cobain, Springsteen and the other outstanding writers of their time, with all the rock and roll energy of the original versions.

This is rock in its full glory, celebrated by a generation that grew up with it, and a new generation experiencing it for the first time. The music is timeless; Rock Re-imagined.

http://chrysalisorchestra.com/

Take a trip through music history with the Great 78 Project

By digitizing songs recorded on 78 rpm records from the 1890s to the 1950s, project preserves old music for future generations.

(via opensource.com) by Chris Hermanson

A few weeks ago, a friend sent me a link to the Great 78 Project, “a community project for the preservation, research, and discovery of 78 rpm records.” The project is supported by the Internet Archive, George Blood, and the Archive of Contemporary Music. Its purpose, first and foremost, is to convert old recordings into digital audio to preserve those historic performances for future listeners. Currently it’s working to digitize the 200,000 or so 78 rpm records it has collected, and it’s actively looking for contributions to add to its collection.

I think this is an exciting project that should be of interest to anyone who enjoys exploring music—and especially those involved in the open community. In this article, I’ll look at a few things you may want to know about the project…

Read more:

https://opensource.com/article/17/9/great-78-project

Boston: Two Tributes to the Classic First Album

Rock N’ Roll Band: What We Can Learn from Boston’s Debut Album

by S.P. Burke

http://www.magazine.tonereport.com/mag/0935566001502385839

Boston’s Debut Album isn’t a Guilty Pleasure–It’s One of the Best Records Ever

by Tim Sommer

Boston’s Debut Album Isn’t a Guilty Pleasure—It’s One of the Best Records Ever

 

24/192 Music Downloads …and why they make no sense

(via xiph.org) 

Articles last month revealed that musician Neil Young and Apple’s Steve Jobs discussed offering digital music downloads of ‘uncompromised studio quality’. Much of the press and user commentary was particularly enthusiastic about the prospect of uncompressed 24 bit 192kHz downloads. 24/192 featured prominently in my own conversations with Mr. Young’s group several months ago.
Unfortunately, there is no point to distributing music in 24-bit/192kHz format. Its playback fidelity is slightly inferior to 16/44.1 or 16/48, and it takes up 6 times the space.
There are a few real problems with the audio quality and ‘experience’ of digitally distributed music today. 24/192 solves none of them. While everyone fixates on 24/192 as a magic bullet, we’re not going to see any actual improvement…

Read more:

https://xiph.org/~xiphmont/demo/neil-young.html

The Unlikely Return of Cat Stevens

Photograph by Matt Writtle / eyevine / Redux

(via The New Yorker) By

n a Cat Stevens, a.k.a. Yusuf Islam, a.k.a. Yusuf/Cat Stevens, concert in Boston a couple of years ago, there was a hushed pause in the room as the then sixty-six-year-old performer waited for a stagehand to bring him a guitar in between songs. “I’m really happy to be here!” the singer suddenly exclaimed. It did not sound like ersatz show-biz banter; it sounded humble, childlike even, as if he himself were surprised by the emotion. It sounded like capitulation. The crowd, in response, rose to its feet en masse, producing a sound that was more than just a cheer. It was an embrace. It was an acknowledgment by artist and audience alike: Cat Stevens, a figure who, for all intents and purposes, had ceased to exist more than three decades ago, had come back…

Read more:

https://www.newyorker.com/culture/culture-desk/the-unlikely-return-of-cat-stevens

Billy Joel’s 5 Stages of Grief

by Kevin McElvaney

Denial. Anger. Bargaining. Depression. Acceptance.

Swiss psychiatrist Elisabeth Kübler-Ross introduced these Five Stages of Grief in her 1969 book, On Death and Dying. And though the theory was never fully embraced by the scientific community, it did take hold in the popular imagination. In the nearly five decades since its conception, the Kübler-Ross model has been applied not just to death, but to loss of all kinds — ultimately becoming a familiar trope in countless movies and TV shows.

Contrary to popular belief, the author herself never claimed that these five stages happen to everyone, nor that each person experiences them in a predictable order. Still, there’s something comforting about the notion that loss can be overcome, if only we’re patient enough to wait for that elusive fifth step.

At the risk of further watering down an already misunderstood concept, here again are the Five Stages of Grief: this time, told through the songs of the “Piano Man” himself, Mr. Billy Joel…

Read more:

http://www.articulateshow.org/articulate/billy-joels-5-stages-of-grief

Two Very Different Rankings of Steely Dan Albums

In the wake of the death of Walter Becker, we look at two websites who appraised and ranked Steely Dan’s albums, noting that the lists are very different from each other. It’s not surprising, perhaps, given the chameleonic nature of the work of Donald Fagen and Walter Becker. Some of it leans heavily toward jazz and some is more straight-ahead rock. Some lyrics are maddeningly obtuse and some more coherent. These things come down to personal taste sometimes. Which list do you agree with? How would you rank the work of this great band?

http://ultimateclassicrock.com/steely-dan-albums-ranked/

http://www.stereogum.com/1732741/steely-dan-albums-from-worst-to-best/franchises/counting-down/

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