Songs You May Have Missed #620

The Monroes: “What Do all the People Know” (1982)

San Diego pop band The Monroes enjoyed their one moment in the sun in 1982 with the infectious “What Do all the People Know”, which peaked at number 59 on the American pop charts. It echoes the sounds of all those new wavey songs you’ve heard before–except you’ve probably not heard this one before.

Video of the Week: Bob Wood – 80 Years Old and Awesome

Songs You May Have Missed #619

The Outdoor Type: “Day to Day” (2015)

The Outdoor Type are a Melbourne, Australia indie pop band led by singer/songwriter/guitarist Zack Buchanan.

The band was signed to Canadian indie label Nettwerk on the strength of their single “On My Mind”, which earned them 100,000 Spotify plays. But “Day to Day” is as gloriously melancholy and melodic as anything the band has yet done.

Video of the Week: Why This Awful Sounding Album is a Masterpiece

Songs You May Have Missed #618

Los Lonely Boys: “Diamonds” (2006)

Lots of contemporary bands are touted as throwbacks to the sound of classic rock. Few of them sound, to my ears at least, like the sound of rock’s halcyon days.

Los Lonely Boys seem to have soaked in the formula. They know this much at least: Classic rock songs are built around the guitar riff. The riff is central; it is the cornerstone. If you have a great riff beginning the song and repeated throughout, you have the makings of a great rock song. It is the thing “new rock” is missing that 70’s rock bands would never omit.

“Diamonds” is pinned on a killer guitar hook, one that’s easy to get stuck in your head. And the rest of the song is pretty damn fine, too.

Video of the Week: The True Story Behind Dan Fogelberg’s ‘Same Old Lang Syne’

Note: Dan Fogelberg actually died in 2007, not 1997 as the narrator says.

Chrysalis Orchestra: Rock Re-imagined

Rock like you’ve never heard it before.
An orchestra like you’ve never seen before.
An event like you’ve never experienced before.

Introducing Chrysalis Orchestra- a brand new concept in entertainment brought to you by the legendary Terry Ellis, music visionary and co-founder of Chrysalis Records.

Imagine the greatest rock anthems of all time performed with all the power and magnificence of a complete symphony orchestra. But this is not a typical orchestra with musicians sitting pinned behind their music stands. Instead, it’s a forty piece “rock band” with young musicians, each one a virtuoso on his or her instrument, and each one a great performer, on their feet, interacting with the audience.

In its look, its sound, and in every other way, Chrysalis Orchestra is a big show, with dynamic and powerful performances that will get the audience out of their seats. There are no vocalists or electric guitars – it’s an orchestra playing reinterpretations of the rock songs we all know and love, in tribute to the great composers of the rock era. Rather than the music of Mozart and Beethoven, it presents the familiar compositions of Page and Plant, Cobain, Springsteen and the other outstanding writers of their time, with all the rock and roll energy of the original versions.

This is rock in its full glory, celebrated by a generation that grew up with it, and a new generation experiencing it for the first time. The music is timeless; Rock Re-imagined.

http://chrysalisorchestra.com/

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