On a Lighter Note…

Songs You May Have Missed #653

Dawes: “Hey Lover” (2013)

It doesn’t get much simpler than the sentiment (or the chorus) here:

Blue and white racing stripe pick-up truck
And when did I decide to grow this beard and gut?
Well, I may be white but I don’t like my people much
But I want to raise with you and watch our younglings hatch,
Fucking make the first letters of their first names match

Hey lover, hey lover
Hey lover, hey lover

See also: https://edcyphers.com/2012/02/21/recommended-albums-7/

Songs You May Have Missed #652

Badflower: “Daddy” (2019)

Mumble rap, EDM, bro country…it’s a depressing popular music landscape these days for anyone who still prefers music to say something.

Fortunately the genre of rock still has its bright spots here and there, though it may be a bit ironic to use the term for subject matter this dark.

“Daddy”, from Badflower’s 2019 debut Ok, I’m Sick, is an unflinching and impactful vignette of familial abuse. The verses take you to a pretty messed up place. But the chorus has a cathartic clout.

Songs You May Have Missed #651

Steely Dan: “Your Gold Teeth II” (1975)

Donald Fagen is not an easy guy to impress. But when he hears Denny Dias’ guitar solo in a studio outtake run-through of “Your Gold Teeth II”, the song’s co-writer exclaims, “Holy fuck! That’s great!”

It is.

Casual rock fans and critics alike love Aja, Steely Dan’s 1977 jazz-rock fusion masterpiece. But two years and two albums earlier they produced another glossy, sophisticated jazzy rock classic brimming with the sort of great melodic hooks, cryptic lyrics and jaw-dropping performances the Dan are known for, that being the Katy Lied LP.

And no performance tops Dias’ adventurous solo here. “Your Gold Teeth II”–so-named because the band had already released a song called “Your Gold Teeth” two years earlier–neatly straddles the fence between accessible pop rock and real jazz.

1970’s Steely Dan were the open-minded pop rock fan’s gateway drug into jazz exploration.

Just as Gentle Giant knocked holes in the wall separating English progressive rock and jazz, Steely Dan at their best blurred the lines between the worlds of bop, pop, and what is now called Yacht Rock–except that term seems to do a disservice to the excellence of the Steely Dan catalog.

If this is Yacht Rock, I’m on board with it.

Video of the Week: When You Listen to the Radio When You’re Hungry

On a Lighter Note…

Quora: Who is Bungalow Bill in that Beatles song?

(via Quora) Answered by Jon Pennington

The real life inspiration for Bungalow Bill was a 27-year-old American man named Richard A. Cooke III (known as “Rik” for short). In 1968, Rik was in Rishikesh visiting his mother, Nancy Cooke de Herrera, a publicist for the Maharishi Mahesh Yogi. As the Maharishi’s publicist, Nancy would also serve as a liaison between the Maharishi and the Beatles, while the Beatles were learning Transcendental Meditation.

The actress Mia Farrow described Nancy’s arrival at the Maharishi’s ashram as follows:

A self-important middle-aged American woman arrived, moving a mountain of luggage into the brand-new private bungalow next to Maharishi’s…People fled this newcomer and no one was sorry when she left the ashram after a short time to go tiger hunting.

I can’t quite get a read on what the original motivation was for the tiger hunt. Some depictions I’ve read portray Nancy and Rik as two socialites who blithely jaunted off to go safari while in the middle of a shallow spiritual quest. Other depictions I’ve read say that an Indian guide, Avi Kohli, encouraged Rik to kill the tiger, because the tiger was endangering some elephants and might have even endangered some villagers too…

Read more: https://www.quora.com/Who-is-Bungalow-Bill-in-that-Beatles-song

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