Recommended Albums #80

The Tripwores: Makes You Look Around (2007)

If you expect a collection of 90’s-era, Seattle-area musicians to sound grungy, quasi-supergroup The Tripwires–made up of members of such bands as Screaming Trees, The Minus 5, Young Fresh Fellows and Supersuckers–would be a suprise.

But the surprise would be a pleasant one if you appreciate guitar pop with smart lyrics, knockout hooks, sweet guitar interplay and tasty solos.

The Tripwires have released only two albums, this debut and 2009’s House to House. While I’d give a slight edge to the former, both are excellent.

For fans of power pop, or the pub rock of Nick Lowe, Rockpile and Dave Edmunds.

 

Listen to: “Arm Twister”

 

Listen to: “Big Electric Light”

 

Listen to: “Comedienne”

 

Listen to: “Sold Yer Guitar Blues”

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Unraveling the Many Mysteries of Neil Diamond’s ‘Sweet Caroline’

(Getty Images)

Digging into Diamond’s inspiration and how the song became a staple at Fenway Park.

(via Mental Floss) by Kenneth Partridge

The story of Neil Diamond’s “Sweet Caroline” has it all: love, baseball, Kennedys, Frank Sinatra, Elvis, and the triumph of the human spirit. It’s pop’s answer to the national anthem, and as any karaoke belter or Boston Red Sox fan will tell you, it’s way easier to sing than “The Star-Spangled Banner.” As the song celebrated its 50th birthday in 2019, now’s a good time—so good, so good, so good—to dig into the rich history of a tune people will still be singing in 2069.

“Where it began, I can’t begin to knowing,” Diamond sings in the song’s iconic opening lines. Except the “where” part of this story is actually pretty simple: Diamond wrote “Sweet Caroline” in a Memphis hotel room in 1969 on the eve of a recording session at American Sound Studio. By this point in his career, Diamond had established himself as a fairly well-known singer-songwriter with two top-10 hits—”Cherry Cherry” and “Girl, You’ll Be a Woman Soon”—to his name. He’d also written “I’m a Believer,” which The Monkees took to #1 in late 1966…

Read more: https://getpocket.com/explore/item/unraveling-the-many-mysteries-of-neil-diamond-s-sweet-caroline?utm_source=pocket-newtab

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“This Land Is Your Land”: The Story Behind America’s Best-Known Protest Song

(Getty Images)

(via Mental Floss) BY Kenneth Partridge

Few songs are more ingrained in the American psyche than “This Land Is Your Land,” the greatest and best-known work by folk icon Woody Guthrie. For decades, it’s been a staple of kindergarten classrooms “from California to the New York island,” as the lyrics go. It’s the musical equivalent of apple pie, though the flavor varies wildly depending on who’s doing the singing.

On its most basic level, “This Land Is Your Land” is a song about inclusion and equality—the American ideal broken down into simple, eloquent language and set to a melody you memorize on first listen. The underlying message, repeated throughout the song, makes the heart swell: “This land was made for you and me.”

But there’s more to “This Land Is Your Land” than many people realize—two verses more, in fact. Guthrie’s original 1940 draft of the song contains six verses, two of which carry progressive political messages that add nuance to the song’s overt patriotism. These controversial verses are generally omitted from children’s songbooks and the like, but they speak volumes about Guthrie’s mindset when he put pen to paper 80 years ago…

Read more: https://www.mentalfloss.com/article/585577/this-land-your-land-americas-best-known-protest-song

Songs You May Have Missed #664

Clannad: “Theme from Harry’s Game” (1982)

“Everything that is and was will cease to be” is the message of a song that the Irish family band was commissioned to write for an English TV miniseries that touched on the futility of political violence.

It became the first Irish-language song to chart in the UK (#5) won an Igor Novello award and featured in several Hollywood movies, including Patriot Games.

At the peak of the global success the song brought them, singer Moya Brennan related, they were asked what it was like to write a hit song. Their answer: “Oh come on, be serious, if you were trying to write a hit song would you have written it in Gaelic?”

See also: https://edcyphers.com/2016/04/27/songs-you-may-have-missed-585/

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Filmmaker Wes Tank’s must-see mashup of Dr. Dre and Dr. Seuss.

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