Video of the Week: Dean Ford’s More Reflective ‘Reflections of My Life’

The Marmalade’s 1970 hit “Reflections of My LIfe” rose above typical radio fodder of its time. Infused with wistful longing, the song managed heart-baring emotion without slipping into the maudlin melodrama common to the era.

Forty-four years later Dean Ford found still more layers of beauty in this reflective pop chestnut. Dean was himself “taken back home” four years after this recording.

The classic 1970 version is below.

30 Facts About ‘This Is Spinal Tap’

(via 80’s Kids) by Matt M

This Is Spinal Tap is one of the most well-known examples of the “Mockumentary” genre and pretty much started that genre all by itself. The film has gone down in history as a cult classic and is often quoted, especially when anyone wants to crack something up to 11! Let’s take a look back at this classic film with some facts that you may not have known…

30. The Stonehenge scene predates a similar incident involving Black Sabbath

For years, This Is Spinal Tap has been hailed as one of the funniest films ever thanks to its hilarious portrayal of the rock star lifestyle.

What makes the film all the more amusing is the fact that many of its most absurd moments are based on real incidents – although in one notable scene, the film uncannily predicts a rock’n’roll blunder which had yet to occur.

This includes the unforgettable Stonehenge sequence, in which a set designer (Anjelica Huston) builds a replica of the legendary monument based on a sketch from the band.

Unfortunately, the sketch provided gave the proportions in inches rather than feet, hence the band end up playing alongside a miniature Stonehenge on stage.

This scene was originally shot in 1982 for a short film which helped the filmmakers get a green light for the feature – but a year later, a bizarrely similar thing happened in real life to Black Sabbath.

The British rockers commissioned a replica of Stonehenge for their set on their 1983 tour – but as in This Is Spinal Tap, it wound up the wrong size due to an administrative error.

In Black Sabbath’s case, rather than having a model a fraction of the size of the real Stonehenge, theirs was more than twice as big as the real monument…

Read more: https://www.eightieskids.com/things-you-didnt-know-about-this-is-spinal-tap

See also: https://edcyphers.com/2012/12/05/this-is-spinal-tap-the-complete-script/

On a Lighter Note…

The Good Parts of Bad Company

nostalgiacentral.com

(Reprinted from Music Aficionado) by Gene Santoro

Sometimes rock is just rock. The blue-collar kind that doesn’t aspire to be artsy, that just wants to hit and finesse bedrock sounds that give fans a good-time jolt.

Coming at the end of the classic rock era, Bad Company aimed at that mark—and for the first two albums, mostly hit it.

As they steered between overstuffed prog-rock and introspective singer-songwriters, they pared back roots-rock styles to be lean and mean. But they tucked in nuances that, listening today, make the hits you’ve heard so many times pop with subliminal surprises.

For a while. Then they and the arena-rockers who rose in their wake turned their discipline and chops into radio-ready formulas—and helped paved the way for punk’s extreme rock teardown and reboot…

Read more: https://web.musicaficionado.com/main/article/the_good_parts_of_bad_company_by_genesantoro

Songs You May Have Missed #671

Fool’s Garden: “Lemon Tree” (1995)

Released in 1995, Fool’s Garden’s “Lemon Tree” hit number one not only in the band’s native Germany but in Austria, Ireland, Iceland, Sweden and Norway.

Although it also peaked at #26 in the UK pop charts, it was never a hit in the U.S.

This song is familiar enough around the world to have spawned several cover versions and even a Christmas parody (“Christmas Tree”) but if you’re American you’re likely hearing it for the first time.

And that’s what Songs You May Have Missed is all about.

Songs You May Have Missed #670

Abba: “Slipping Through My Fingers” (1981)

When we last featured Abba in this series of posts, we were wiping a tear away as we listened to the tale of marital disintegration “My Love, My Life” from their aptly-named 1977 stateside breakthrough album Arrival.

Despite the bright, poppy, polyester image these Swedes are sadly saddled with, actually they could serve up heartache like few bands of any era, perhaps because too often the heartache in the writing was of the autobiographical sort.

So here’s a fresh serving of pain–a tune about a mother’s regret in watching her daughter grow up too soon, inspired by band members Bjorn and Agnetha’s (at the time) seven-year-old daughter Linda Ulvaeus.

The song was released as a single only in Japan, as a promo single for the Coca-Cola company. The Visitors, from which it came, was their eighth and–unbeknownst to them at the time–final album.

Schoolbag in hand, she leaves home in the early morning
Waving goodbye with an absent-minded smile
I watch her go with a surge of that well-known sadness
And I have to sit down for a while

The feeling that I’m losing her forever
And without really entering her world
I’m glad whenever I can share her laughter
That funny little girl

Slipping through my fingers all the time
I try to capture every minute
The feeling in it
Slipping through my fingers all the time
Do I really see what’s in her mind
Each time I think I’m close to knowing
She keeps on growing
Slipping through my fingers all the time

Sleep in our eyes
Her and me at the breakfast table
Barely awake, I let precious time go by
Then when she’s gone
There’s that odd melancholy feeling
And a sense of guilt I can’t deny

What happened to the wonderful adventures
The places I had planned for us to go
(Slipping through my fingers all the time)
Well, some of that we did but most we didn’t
And why, I just don’t know

Slipping through my fingers all the time
I try to capture every minute
The feeling in it
Slipping through my fingers all the time
Do I really see what’s in her mind
Each time I think I’m close to knowing
She keeps on growing
Slipping through my fingers all the time

Sometimes I wish that I could freeze the picture
And save it from the funny tricks of time
Slipping through my fingers

Slipping through my fingers all the time

Schoolbag in hand she leaves home in the early morning
Waving goodbye with an absent-minded smile

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is coke-abba-single.jpg

See also: https://edcyphers.com/2012/05/01/songs-you-may-have-missed-94/

Video of the Week: When a Costumed Person Destroys The Drums At Children’s Music Concert

Or, as variously described in the viewer comments:

When you’re a death metal drummer, but it’s your little brother’s birthday party.

When you get a PHD in food science but end up working at your local McDonalds

“No matter how hard I try to run from my past, I can’t escape what I truly am.”

This is like hiring Gordon ramsay to make you a slice of toast.

“This suit is not to protect me, but to limit my power”

I can just feel his frustration. Every stroke is harder and angrier than the last. “Is this what my life has come to? All those drum lessons. All those dreams of being a rock god, reduced to… this?”

Plot twist: the cameras turns to the crowd of kindergarteners slam dancing

Teacher: Does anyone here play an instrument? The quiet kid:

Nah, this guy just saw his crush walk into the concert

That drum must had smoked a pack of cigarettes after that

That moment when she says she wants you to dress up in something weird so you can come over and smash…but you misunderstand….

This is like hiring Eminem to sing you a bed time story

When your metal band isn’t making enough money…

When u play the tutorial after finishing the game

Plot twist: He’s not wearing a costume.

This guy had a bowl of nails for breakfast without any milk

Video of the Week: Peter Frampton on his new memoir, David Bowie and overcoming the “depths of despair”

Arlo Guthrie Announces His Retirement from Touring

The following is reprinted from Arlo Guthrie’s official website:

Gone Fishing

It’s been a great 50+ years of being a working entertainer, but I reached the difficult decision that touring and stage shows are no longer possible. That’s the short version. For the longer version continue reading…

As a folksinger, I never really thought much about getting older. It seemed to me that I could just continue year after year, decade after decade, singing and playing as I had done for most of my life. As the years went by, it got more difficult to keep touring, but I did it, mostly because I’d been doing it my entire life. It was the life I knew and loved.

In 2016 on April 1st, April Fools Day, I got really dizzy in the parking lot of the hotel, and started seeing as though I were looking through a kaleidoscope. That evening the show went on as though nothing had happened. I had no idea I’d just encountered a mini stroke until weeks later, when I was told about it. It didn’t appear to affect my performance, or my state of being. I continued touring for the next 4 years. 

Then, on Thanksgiving Day 2019 (of all freaking days) it happened again. This time I was on my way to The Church / The Guthrie Center to help out with our annual Thanksgiving Dinner that we hold every year. I had pulled over to fuel up and realized I couldn’t continue to drive safely, as everything was spinning around, sort of like the old days, but without the help of illegal substances. I was taken to the hospital, and was under evaluation, when I broke out. I had an important gig at Carnegie Hall in New York – The end of an annual series I’d been doing for decades and it was Sold Out. I had to be there. It was imperative.

The next morning I left the hospital, took the family and headed for New York. And what a show it was! We wrapped up 50 years with a terrific evening with the entire family on stage. I really enjoyed it.

The following day I flew to my home in Sebastian, FL just as I had done for years, this time with the history of Carnegie Hall behind me. My girlfriend, Marti picked me up at the airport, and we settled into the routine of being on the river I loved. Two nights after arriving home, I awoke in the morning and was lurching from sIde to side. I knew something was wrong, and went to keep a doctors appointment we’d previously set up. The doc said, “You need to go to the hospital — Now.”

So, Marti took me to the hospital nearby in Vero Beach. They kept me there for 3 days, running tests of all kinds, and essentially informed me that I’d suffered a stroke. This time was more serious, as I’d lost some ability to walk, and I wondered if if would be able to play music. I spent about a week in a rehab center to re-learn the basics, like walking. I went home after that, and began a regimen of playing guitar, walking… All the things I would need to continue touring and performing. During the entire time, Marti kept the family and close friends advised as to my progress, and took really great care of me. I needed all the help I could get. And she was there to see it done right. 

By the the time our first shows began in 2020, I was at about at 80% and felt like I was improving. Then the pandemic hit. All the shows we had planned for 2020 were at first, postponed, then rescheduled and finally cancelled. My hopes for a gradual recovery onstage came to an abrupt end. 

Meanwhile, I’d decided back in 2018 to move from the home in Florida. And just as I’d returned from our last gig in Tennessee, a buyer appeared, and we had a deal on the table to sell The CrabHouse. I wasn’t in any shape to go through the intricacies of selling a guitar pick, let alone a home with 30 years of stuff we’d collected. Marti ended up doing it all. She finalized the deal, and dealt with the stuff that either had to be sold, moved or thrown out. It was quite a lot. But, through garage sales, online markets, movers and friends, she’d pretty much emptied the CrabHouse of everything, and we moved into her place about a mile away. 

We were there for a few weeks, before it was safe enough to return to The Farm in Massachusetts. That was in June 2020. Since then we’ve been holed up at The Farm trying to keep out of harms way, and also trying to provide some online entertainment for our friends who were, and continue to be, holed up wherever they are. My band and crew arranged a few short gigs that were filmed at The Church, but when I saw the play-back in the editing room I realized that it was not up to the standards I expected of myself, let alone the expectations that our friends and fans had come to enjoy. 

A folksinger’s shelf life may be a lot longer than a dancer or an athlete, but at some point, unless you’re incredibly fortunate or just plain whacko (either one or both) it’s time to hang up the “Gone Fishing” sign. Going from town to town and doing stage shows, remaining on the road is no longer an option. 

I don’t remember answering the question on the other side of that piece of paper when I was asked “Kid! Have you rehabilitated yourself?” But, the short answer is now clearly, “No!” In fact, I hope to be a thorn in the side of a new administration pretty soon. Tom Paine once wrote “To argue with a man who has renounced the use … of reason, and whose philosophy consists in holding humanity in contempt, is like administering medicine to the dead….” In other words, you cannot and should not argue with people who don’t care, or hold the caring of others in contempt. A healthy suspicion of authority, left, right or center has been the hallmark of my career since the beginning, and I will continue to poke fun at cultural, political, or personal absurdities as I see it. I’m actually looking forward to it. 

I’m happy, healthy and good to go, even if I’m not going anywhere. I’ve taken back 6-9 months that I used to spend on the road, and enjoying myself with Marti, my family and friends. In short – Gone Fishing.

On a Lighter Note…

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