Video of the Week: When a Costumed Person Destroys The Drums At Children’s Music Concert

Or, as variously described in the viewer comments:

When you’re a death metal drummer, but it’s your little brother’s birthday party.

When you get a PHD in food science but end up working at your local McDonalds

“No matter how hard I try to run from my past, I can’t escape what I truly am.”

This is like hiring Gordon ramsay to make you a slice of toast.

“This suit is not to protect me, but to limit my power”

I can just feel his frustration. Every stroke is harder and angrier than the last. “Is this what my life has come to? All those drum lessons. All those dreams of being a rock god, reduced to… this?”

Plot twist: the cameras turns to the crowd of kindergarteners slam dancing

Teacher: Does anyone here play an instrument? The quiet kid:

Nah, this guy just saw his crush walk into the concert

That drum must had smoked a pack of cigarettes after that

That moment when she says she wants you to dress up in something weird so you can come over and smash…but you misunderstand….

This is like hiring Eminem to sing you a bed time story

When your metal band isn’t making enough money…

When u play the tutorial after finishing the game

Plot twist: He’s not wearing a costume.

This guy had a bowl of nails for breakfast without any milk

Video of the Week: Peter Frampton on his new memoir, David Bowie and overcoming the “depths of despair”

Arlo Guthrie Announces His Retirement from Touring

The following is reprinted from Arlo Guthrie’s official website:

Gone Fishing

It’s been a great 50+ years of being a working entertainer, but I reached the difficult decision that touring and stage shows are no longer possible. That’s the short version. For the longer version continue reading…

As a folksinger, I never really thought much about getting older. It seemed to me that I could just continue year after year, decade after decade, singing and playing as I had done for most of my life. As the years went by, it got more difficult to keep touring, but I did it, mostly because I’d been doing it my entire life. It was the life I knew and loved.

In 2016 on April 1st, April Fools Day, I got really dizzy in the parking lot of the hotel, and started seeing as though I were looking through a kaleidoscope. That evening the show went on as though nothing had happened. I had no idea I’d just encountered a mini stroke until weeks later, when I was told about it. It didn’t appear to affect my performance, or my state of being. I continued touring for the next 4 years. 

Then, on Thanksgiving Day 2019 (of all freaking days) it happened again. This time I was on my way to The Church / The Guthrie Center to help out with our annual Thanksgiving Dinner that we hold every year. I had pulled over to fuel up and realized I couldn’t continue to drive safely, as everything was spinning around, sort of like the old days, but without the help of illegal substances. I was taken to the hospital, and was under evaluation, when I broke out. I had an important gig at Carnegie Hall in New York – The end of an annual series I’d been doing for decades and it was Sold Out. I had to be there. It was imperative.

The next morning I left the hospital, took the family and headed for New York. And what a show it was! We wrapped up 50 years with a terrific evening with the entire family on stage. I really enjoyed it.

The following day I flew to my home in Sebastian, FL just as I had done for years, this time with the history of Carnegie Hall behind me. My girlfriend, Marti picked me up at the airport, and we settled into the routine of being on the river I loved. Two nights after arriving home, I awoke in the morning and was lurching from sIde to side. I knew something was wrong, and went to keep a doctors appointment we’d previously set up. The doc said, “You need to go to the hospital — Now.”

So, Marti took me to the hospital nearby in Vero Beach. They kept me there for 3 days, running tests of all kinds, and essentially informed me that I’d suffered a stroke. This time was more serious, as I’d lost some ability to walk, and I wondered if if would be able to play music. I spent about a week in a rehab center to re-learn the basics, like walking. I went home after that, and began a regimen of playing guitar, walking… All the things I would need to continue touring and performing. During the entire time, Marti kept the family and close friends advised as to my progress, and took really great care of me. I needed all the help I could get. And she was there to see it done right. 

By the the time our first shows began in 2020, I was at about at 80% and felt like I was improving. Then the pandemic hit. All the shows we had planned for 2020 were at first, postponed, then rescheduled and finally cancelled. My hopes for a gradual recovery onstage came to an abrupt end. 

Meanwhile, I’d decided back in 2018 to move from the home in Florida. And just as I’d returned from our last gig in Tennessee, a buyer appeared, and we had a deal on the table to sell The CrabHouse. I wasn’t in any shape to go through the intricacies of selling a guitar pick, let alone a home with 30 years of stuff we’d collected. Marti ended up doing it all. She finalized the deal, and dealt with the stuff that either had to be sold, moved or thrown out. It was quite a lot. But, through garage sales, online markets, movers and friends, she’d pretty much emptied the CrabHouse of everything, and we moved into her place about a mile away. 

We were there for a few weeks, before it was safe enough to return to The Farm in Massachusetts. That was in June 2020. Since then we’ve been holed up at The Farm trying to keep out of harms way, and also trying to provide some online entertainment for our friends who were, and continue to be, holed up wherever they are. My band and crew arranged a few short gigs that were filmed at The Church, but when I saw the play-back in the editing room I realized that it was not up to the standards I expected of myself, let alone the expectations that our friends and fans had come to enjoy. 

A folksinger’s shelf life may be a lot longer than a dancer or an athlete, but at some point, unless you’re incredibly fortunate or just plain whacko (either one or both) it’s time to hang up the “Gone Fishing” sign. Going from town to town and doing stage shows, remaining on the road is no longer an option. 

I don’t remember answering the question on the other side of that piece of paper when I was asked “Kid! Have you rehabilitated yourself?” But, the short answer is now clearly, “No!” In fact, I hope to be a thorn in the side of a new administration pretty soon. Tom Paine once wrote “To argue with a man who has renounced the use … of reason, and whose philosophy consists in holding humanity in contempt, is like administering medicine to the dead….” In other words, you cannot and should not argue with people who don’t care, or hold the caring of others in contempt. A healthy suspicion of authority, left, right or center has been the hallmark of my career since the beginning, and I will continue to poke fun at cultural, political, or personal absurdities as I see it. I’m actually looking forward to it. 

I’m happy, healthy and good to go, even if I’m not going anywhere. I’ve taken back 6-9 months that I used to spend on the road, and enjoying myself with Marti, my family and friends. In short – Gone Fishing.

On a Lighter Note…

The Mamas and the Papas: A Look Behind the Curtains

Michelle Phillips, John Phillips, Mama Cass, and Denny Doherty. Photo by Globe Photos / Mediapunch / Shutterstock

(via musicoholics) By Alva Yaffe

The folk-rock classic group, The Mamas & the Papas, provided a delightful soundtrack to the decade of the 1960s with their catchy tunes “California Dreamin’” and “Monday, Monday.” John Phillips, Michelle Phillips, Denny Doherty, and Cass Elliot hit their peak of fame in the ’60s and ultimately helped to define the music scene of American counterculture during that time.

Although they reached major success during their career together, life behind the scenes wasn’t always smooth sailing. The seemingly “groovy” era of free love and the sea of drugs that came with it took a toll on the band, both as a unit and individually. The drama that occurred during the mere five years of working together was enough to last a lifetime. With all the affairs, parties, drug abuse, break-ups and reunions, the drama had lasting effects that are still felt to this day. Even Frank Sinatra used his Mafia connections to send one of the members a special “warning.”

See what really happened with this bizarre yet talented group, whose music is undeniably worth listening to…

Read more: https://www.musicoholics.com/backstage-stories/the-mamas-and-the-papas-a-look-behind-the-curtains/

How Eddie Van Halen’s Uncredited Guitar Solo on Michael Jackson’s ‘Beat It’ Came to Be

Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

(via ET) By Meredith B. Kile‍

Following Eddie Van Halen’s death on Tuesday from a lengthy battle with cancer, the late rocker’s friends and fellow musicians took to social media to remember the legendary musician and Van Halen founder.

Van Halen, who founded his iconic eponymous rock group with brother Alex in 1972, is widely regarded as one of the most talented guitarists in rock history and was a consistent presence in the group through several hiatuses and lineup shifts.

However, something casual fans might not know is that one of Van Halen’s most memorable contributions to music history didn’t have his name on it at all. The guitarist played an unpaid, initially uncredited solo on one of the biggest pop songs of all time: Michael Jackson’s “Beat It.”

Read more: https://www.etonline.com/how-eddie-van-halens-uncredited-guitar-solo-on-michael-jacksons-beat-it-came-to-be-154293

Video of the Week: Leonid & Friends–The Story So Far

How the Loss of Justice Ginsburg Impacts Music Creators

(via Advocacy)

As the music world mourns the loss of Ruth Bader Ginsburg, one of its biggest copyright champions, it also looks to the short-term and long-term battles ahead

On Sept. 18, the music community lost a huge advocate in Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Aside from her years of work as a trailblazer for equality and nearly three decades on the Supreme Court of the United States, RBG was known as a pro-copyright jurist who routinely found herself aligned with music creators…

Read more: https://www.grammy.com/advocacy/news/how-loss-justice-ginsburg-impacts-music-creators

Video of the Week: (I’ve Been) Searchin’ So Long – Leonid & Friends

Video of the Week: Barry Gibb–The Last Bee Gee

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