Songs You May Have Missed #679

Republic Tigers: “Latter Daisy” (2020)

“What’s especially fascinating about listening to the Republic Tigers’ Mind Over Matter with the knowledge of the last seven or eight years of musical history is the fact that, had it been released when originally intended, it would’ve been way ahead of the curve.”- The Pitch.

Yes, back when this blog first spotlighted Republic Tigers with 2008’s sweeping “Buildings & Mountains”, we mentioned that their second full-length release was expected in 2012.

Well, that second LP has been completed since 2012 but…stuff happens. Legal complications caused the band to shelve the record until 2020, and the amazing thing is how fresh and modern this time capsule of an album sounds despite a lack of remixing, remastering or tinkering of any kind.

And it’s not just in the sparkling arrangements or production. Lyrics such as  “It’s time we build a wall / that keeps us thinking small” from the lead track and single “Falco Peregrinus” seem prescient, as if written in the year of their ultimate release.

But to this listener’s ear, it’s “Latter Daisy” that’s the most infectious earworm on the album. Like the two previous Tigers songs this blog has featured, give this one a few listens and you’ll find it burrowing into your brain in the sweetest way.

See also: Songs You May Have Missed #82 | Every Moment Has A Song (edcyphers.com)

See also: Songs You May Have Missed #389 | Every Moment Has A Song (edcyphers.com)

Songs You May Have Missed #678

Gene Simmons: “See You Tonite” (1978)

Gene Simmons rocks. Uh, most of the time. Certainly that’s how he made his bones with his full time band.

But this Beatlesque nugget, like much of his 1978 eponomous solo album, must have taken fans a bit by surprise. “See You Tonite” brings to mind early Badfinger, or the Raspberries in one of their quieter moments. Strings and sweet harmonies from Dr. Love? Who’da thought?

Check out an unplugged Kiss performance of the song below:

Songs You May Have Missed #677

Arlo Parks: “Too Good” (2021)

Anaïs Oluwatoyin Estelle Marinho–known professionally as Arlo Parks–is a London-based musician and poet whose European tour in the early part of 2020 was inturrupted–like so many things–by the COVID-19 pandemic.

“Too Good” is a smoothly soothing, sophisticated standout track from her 2021 debut Collapsed in Sunbeams.

Songs You May Have Missed #676

Ramsey Lewis and Earth, Wind & Fire: “Sun Goddess” (1975)

From R&B/jazz pianist Ramsey Lewis’ gold-selling album of the same name, this 1975 single features members of Earth, Wind & Fire and was co-written by Maurice White.

Although this 45 edit of “Sun Goddess” rose to #44 in the Billboard Hot 100 (and #20 in the soul singles charts) it is a bit of a rare commodity, having never appeared on any American-release EWF album or compilation.

Songs You May Have Missed #675

Graffiti6: “Under the Mask” (2014)

You’d swear this prescient pop tune was released in April of 2020 and not April of 2014:

I see your light
I see your light
No matter where you turn
Or where you hide
I see it all
Shining so bright
You say that you’re not sure
And there’s no cure
But there’s a way
To fly away

There is a light, there is a light in your heart
There is a light burning a fire in the dark
Under the mask, under the mask we’re beautiful
So let out the light, no need to hide anymore
Under the mask

There is a space
There is a space
Somewhere that you belong
It keeps you strong
It’s in my arms
‘Cause it is your space
No matter where we turn
Or where we hide
We’ll fly away
So fly away

There is a light, there is a light in your heart
There is a light burning a fire in the dark
Under the mask, under the mask we’re beautiful
So let out the light, no need to hide anymore

Don’t turn away
Don’t hide away darling
Don’t turn away
Don’t hide away
I see you under the mask
Under the mask

There is a light, there is a light in your heart
There is a light burning a fire in the dark
Under the mask, under the mask we’re beautiful
So let out the light, no need to hide anymore
Under the mask

There is a light, there is a light in your heart
There is a light burning a fire in the dark
Under the mask, under the mask we’re beautiful
So let out the light, no need to hide anymore

See also: Songs You May Have Missed #194 | Every Moment Has A Song (edcyphers.com)

Songs You May Have Missed #674

Venice: “The Family Tree” (1999)

Venice are the Eagles you’ve never heard of.

Comprised of two brothers and their two cousins (also brothers) from–where else–Venice California, the band have been dubbed by David Crosby “the best vocal group in America”.

The list of superstars with whom they’ve performed or recorded is considerable (deep breath): Elton John, Don Henley, Bruce Springsteen, Warren Zevon, Sting, Heart, Phil Collins, Linda Ronstadt, Dolly Parton, Cher, Styx, Brian Wilson, The Beach Boys, Melissa Etheridge, The Doobie Brothers, Kenny Loggins, Dave Mason, Michael McDonald, Bon Jovi, Chris Isaac, Jackson Browne, Stevie Nicks, Ozzy Osbourne, David Crosby, and Billy Idol among others.

For all that, the Californis band’s biggest success has been in the Netherlands, where in 2003 they won that country’s Grammy-equivalent Edison Award for Best International Artist, besting such heavyweights as Coldplay and U2, and where they enjoy consistent radio play and sold-out tours.

Band members also contributed backing vocals on Roger Waters “The Wall Live Tour” from 2010-13.

The poignant “The Family Tree” shows off the meshing of the familial harmonies as the lyrics touch on the topic of the family surviving down the years, something this family band is certainly testament to.

See also: Video of the Week: Skunk Baxter Covers ‘Rikki Don’t Lose That Number’ | Every Moment Has A Song (edcyphers.com)

Songs You May Have Missed #673

Velvet Crush: “Save Me a Place” (2002)

On their aptly-titled fifth album Soft Sounds, Velvet Crush strip down their usual power pop bluster to reveal a more mature side with a collection of thoughtfully-produced originals and well-chosen covers.

“Save Me a Place”, in this writer’s opinion at least, actually betters Lindsey Buckingham’s original Tusk album track.

See also: Songs You May Have Missed #220 | Every Moment Has A Song (edcyphers.com)

Songs You May Have Missed #672

The Submarines: “Birds” (2011)

John Dragonetti and Blake Hazard began their career as musical and romantic partners. Dragonetti produced Hazard’s solo debut, and the two played in each other’s bands.

But post-breakup the two began sharing the songs each had written about the dissolution of their relationship.

Fast forward a few years and the couple reconciled, married, and continued to work together as Submarines, finding success placing songs on TV shows and iPhone commercials.

“Birds” is a highlight from their third full-length album.

Songs You May Have Missed #671

Fool’s Garden: “Lemon Tree” (1995)

Released in 1995, Fool’s Garden’s “Lemon Tree” hit number one not only in the band’s native Germany but in Austria, Ireland, Iceland, Sweden and Norway.

Although it also peaked at #26 in the UK pop charts, it was never a hit in the U.S.

This song is familiar enough around the world to have spawned several cover versions and even a Christmas parody (“Christmas Tree”) but if you’re American you’re likely hearing it for the first time.

And that’s what Songs You May Have Missed is all about.

Songs You May Have Missed #670

Abba: “Slipping Through My Fingers” (1981)

When we last featured Abba in this series of posts, we were wiping a tear away as we listened to the tale of marital disintegration “My Love, My Life” from their aptly-named 1977 stateside breakthrough album Arrival.

Despite the bright, poppy, polyester image these Swedes are sadly saddled with, actually they could serve up heartache like few bands of any era, perhaps because too often the heartache in the writing was of the autobiographical sort.

So here’s a fresh serving of pain–a tune about a mother’s regret in watching her daughter grow up too soon, inspired by band members Bjorn and Agnetha’s (at the time) seven-year-old daughter Linda Ulvaeus.

The song was released as a single only in Japan, as a promo single for the Coca-Cola company. The Visitors, from which it came, was their eighth and–unbeknownst to them at the time–final album.

Schoolbag in hand, she leaves home in the early morning
Waving goodbye with an absent-minded smile
I watch her go with a surge of that well-known sadness
And I have to sit down for a while

The feeling that I’m losing her forever
And without really entering her world
I’m glad whenever I can share her laughter
That funny little girl

Slipping through my fingers all the time
I try to capture every minute
The feeling in it
Slipping through my fingers all the time
Do I really see what’s in her mind
Each time I think I’m close to knowing
She keeps on growing
Slipping through my fingers all the time

Sleep in our eyes
Her and me at the breakfast table
Barely awake, I let precious time go by
Then when she’s gone
There’s that odd melancholy feeling
And a sense of guilt I can’t deny

What happened to the wonderful adventures
The places I had planned for us to go
(Slipping through my fingers all the time)
Well, some of that we did but most we didn’t
And why, I just don’t know

Slipping through my fingers all the time
I try to capture every minute
The feeling in it
Slipping through my fingers all the time
Do I really see what’s in her mind
Each time I think I’m close to knowing
She keeps on growing
Slipping through my fingers all the time

Sometimes I wish that I could freeze the picture
And save it from the funny tricks of time
Slipping through my fingers

Slipping through my fingers all the time

Schoolbag in hand she leaves home in the early morning
Waving goodbye with an absent-minded smile

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is coke-abba-single.jpg

See also: https://edcyphers.com/2012/05/01/songs-you-may-have-missed-94/

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