Quora: Was Bob Dylan jealous of the mass appeal of the Beatles? (Part 2)

(via Quora) Written by Tony Sienzent

While I agree that Dylan was a restless artist following his own muse, there is no denying that he was totally captivated by The Beatles breakthrough hits in America, listening attentively to “I Want To Hold Your Hand” & “She Loves You (Yeah Yeah Yeah).”

Even though most of his purist folkie friends at Gerde’s Folk City club & The Gaslight & similar locations held their noses at this seemingly meaningless teenie-pop, with the exception of Roger McGuinn who went on to form the ‘American Beatles’ band The Byrds, Dylan privately said that The Beatles harmonies were outrageous & their chords made it all valid. He was very attentive & interested in the Beatlemania phenomena & resisted meeting them until Time Magazine gave him a cover, as they did The Beatles previously, so he would be accepted as an equal (and/or better)…

Read more: https://qr.ae/TWGQA4

Quora: Was Bob Dylan jealous of the mass appeal of the Beatles?

(via Quora) Written by Todd Lowry

Yes, Dylan was jealous of the Beatles.

Paul McCartney discovered Bob Dylan’s 1963 “Freewheelin’” album in 1964. All the Beatles had listened to it and it had inspired John and Paul to try writing deeper, more meaningful lyrics. John began by working on a new song called “I’m a Loser.”

In 1964, Dylan met the Beatles at the Delmonico Hotel in New York City. Within minutes of meeting each other, Dylan proceeded to get the Fab Four stoned for the first time on pot.

Dylan’s lyrics had inspired Lennon and McCartney to begin writing “deeper” songs such as “Norwegian Wood” and “Eleanor Rigby.”

Read more: https://www.quora.com/Was-Bob-Dylan-jealous-of-the-mass-appeal-of-the-Beatles

Quora: Why did George Martin make the Beatles rerecord “Please Please Me”?

(via Quora) Written by Matthew Russell

At the very early stage in their career that the Beatles wrote Please Please Me, Martin was very much the one holding all the cards. As the head of the label they were newly signed to and their producer, Martin was the one with the final say on what the band did in the studio, and he still needed to hear something special to convince him that the band were songwriters of the calibre they claimed- or at least aspired- to be. Martin and Parlophone were quite keen to have the band release How Do You Do It, written by songwriter Mitch Murray and later a number one hit for fellow “Merseybeat” act Gerry and the Pacemakers.

The Beatles hated the song (you can see why- they thought it was simplistic and a little old fashioned, and thought it would damage their credibility) but obligingly recorded it. Knowing that they needed to come up with something better in order to keep Parlophone from opting to release How Do You Do It likely spurred Lennon and McCartney on to work harder on their original material…

Read more: https://www.quora.com/Why-did-George-Martin-make-the-Beatles-rerecord-Please-Please-Me

Quora: How was “Free as a Bird” by The Beatles Recorded?

(via Quora) Answered by George Paolini

It all started with a cassette version of the song recorded by John Lennon in his apartment in New York in 1977 …

To put a bit of context behind this time in his life, John was a homebody, taking care of Sean and baking bread. He was getting pretty good at the baking and apparently even thought about opening a bakery. Meanwhile, Yoko was investing John’s money in things like cattle ranches. Also, during this time, John and Paul had reconciled and had even considered, as a lark, taking up Lorne Michael’s farcical offer to pay the Beatles $1,000 each to reunite on Saturday Night Live.

So, given this period in his life, it is amazing he was still writing…

Read more:

https://www.quora.com/How-was-Free-as-a-Bird-by-The-Beatles-recorded

A Hard Day’s Night: Solving a Beatles Mystery with Mathematics

(via ABC Australia) by Joel Werner

It’s probably the most recognisable sound in popular music.
“This is the one chord that everyone around the world knows,” says Randy Bachman, a rock star in his own right from The Guess Who and Bachman Turner Overdrive.
It dates to July 1964 — the height of Beatlemania. The band was about to release its third album.
For the first time, it was all original music. Plus, the Beatles were shifting away from their rock ‘n’ roll roots to a more poppy sound, and this album was to be the soundtrack for their first feature film.
They needed to make a statement…

Read more:

http://www.abc.net.au/news/science/2017-11-05/a-hard-days-night-how-mathematics-revealed-beatles-secret/9093348

Video of the Week: Todd Rundgren and Utopia’s Spot-On 1980 Beatles Parody

deface

Todd Rundgren’s band Utopia, with whom he released albums sporadically while maintaining a solo career (think Phil Collins and Genesis) explored both short-form pop and ambitious progressive-leaning rock. They also released one of the great Beatle parody works, their 1980 Deface the Music album.

In the above Spinal Tap-esque retrofied video the band perform “I Just Want to Touch You” while evoking Ed Sullivan shows of yore and the “I Want to Hold Your Hand” Beatles era. Other tracks from Deface the Music explore later period Beatle tunes, sending up “Eleanor Rigby”, “Penny Lane” and others.

Utopia were also responsible for the original recording of England Dan & John Ford Coley’s hit “Love is the Answer”, written by Rundgren.

The Surprising Chord That Helped Make “Penny Lane” a Masterpiece

paul

by Scott Freiman

via CultureSonar

McCartney pulls off a difficult songwriting feat by placing the verses and the choruses in neighboring keys (the verses are in B and the choruses are in A). At the end of the song, McCartney writes a key change so that the final chorus is in B, bringing the song full circle. Yet, it’s in the verse that McCartney injects a magical chord that helps make “Penny Lane” a case study in great songwriting. I’ll let you in on McCartney’s secret in this video.

Read more: http://www.culturesonar.com/penny-lane/

Previous Older Entries

%d bloggers like this: