7 Wedding Traditions That Have Disappeared Over the Past Century

trad

(via msn lifestyle) by Emilie Le Beau Lucchesi

Almost a century ago, an Illinois bride cracked open her wedding diary. The thin, white-cloth covered book had empty pages where a bride could record the details of her nuptials. There was a page to describe how the couple met, another to note the engagement, and several to paste in the engagement announcements.

The bride, 18-year-old Marjorie Gotthart, was seemingly unimpressed with the book. She completed only one page – a form designed to resemble a marriage certificate. In big, loopy cursive, she recorded who she married, when, and where. The rest of the pages were empty.

Marjorie’s slight wedding diary was typical for brides of her time. The book did not devote any pages to receptions or pre-nuptial parties. There was no space for a bride to describe her reception venue, the music played by the band, or the meal served. Couples of that era most often married in their parents’ home, usually on a weekday. The lavish affairs that are now de rigueur didn’t become popular until the 1970s.

This means the customs we now call “traditions” are fairly recent. The Saturday evening affair with dinner, dancing, centerpieces, and party favors is not a long-standing tradition. For most modern wedding guests, a “traditional” American wedding would be totally unrecognizable. Here are seven traditions that have changed the most over the years.

1. Traditional weddings were on weekdays.

More than a century ago, there was a rhyme that helped brides pick a date. Mondays were for wealth and Tuesdays for health. “Wednesday the best day of all, Thursdays for crosses, Fridays for losses, and Saturday for no luck at all.” The 1903 White House Etiquette guide reminded young, society women of the rhyme and also noted that in addition to bringing terrible luck, Saturday weddings were terribly unfashionable…

Read more: http://www.msn.com/en-us/lifestyle/weddings/7-wedding-traditions-that-have-disappeared-over-the-past-century/ar-BBsnfxH?li=BBnb7Kz

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: