A Picture’s Worth a Thousand Words: Stories Behind Iconic Album Covers

Source: Amazon / Photo by Dezo Hoffman, Shutterstock

(via musicoholics)

Rubber Soul, The Beatles (1965)

Photographer Robert Freeman snapped the picture of the band in John Lennon’s garden. The stretched effect was actually a mistake made while the band was looking at Robert’s samples. He projected the image onto a cardboard cutout, but when the cardboard fell backwards, the image became stretched. The band ended up loving the image and felt like it was a perfect depiction of their new sound.

The album’s typography was designed by Charles Front. He used the title as inspiration and created a typeface style that was used for psychedelic and flower-power designs. Charles also added another hidden element to his lettering. The title reads “Road Abbey” if you hold the album upside down in front of a mirror…

Read more: A Picture’s Worth a Thousand Words: Stories Behind Iconic Album Covers – page 3 of 36 – Musicoholics

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