Songs You May Have Missed #619

The Outdoor Type: “Day to Day” (2015)

The Outdoor Type are a Melbourne, Australia indie pop band led by singer/songwriter/guitarist Zack Buchanan.

The band was signed to Canadian indie label Nettwerk on the strength of their single “On My Mind”, which earned them 100,000 Spotify plays. But “Day to Day” is as gloriously melancholy and melodic as anything the band has yet done.

Video of the Week: Why This Awful Sounding Album is a Masterpiece

Songs You May Have Missed #618

Los Lonely Boys: “Diamonds” (2006)

Lots of contemporary bands are touted as throwbacks to the sound of classic rock. Few of them sound, to my ears at least, like the sound of rock’s halcyon days.

Los Lonely Boys seem to have soaked in the formula. They know this much at least: Classic rock songs are built around the guitar riff. The riff is central; it is the cornerstone. If you have a great riff beginning the song and repeated throughout, you have the makings of a great rock song. It is the thing “new rock” is missing that 70’s rock bands would never omit.

“Diamonds” is pinned on a killer guitar hook, one that’s easy to get stuck in your head. And the rest of the song is pretty damn fine, too.

Video of the Week: The True Story Behind Dan Fogelberg’s ‘Same Old Lang Syne’

Note: Dan Fogelberg actually died in 2007, not 1997 as the narrator says.

Chrysalis Orchestra: Rock Re-imagined

Rock like you’ve never heard it before.
An orchestra like you’ve never seen before.
An event like you’ve never experienced before.

Introducing Chrysalis Orchestra- a brand new concept in entertainment brought to you by the legendary Terry Ellis, music visionary and co-founder of Chrysalis Records.

Imagine the greatest rock anthems of all time performed with all the power and magnificence of a complete symphony orchestra. But this is not a typical orchestra with musicians sitting pinned behind their music stands. Instead, it’s a forty piece “rock band” with young musicians, each one a virtuoso on his or her instrument, and each one a great performer, on their feet, interacting with the audience.

In its look, its sound, and in every other way, Chrysalis Orchestra is a big show, with dynamic and powerful performances that will get the audience out of their seats. There are no vocalists or electric guitars – it’s an orchestra playing reinterpretations of the rock songs we all know and love, in tribute to the great composers of the rock era. Rather than the music of Mozart and Beethoven, it presents the familiar compositions of Page and Plant, Cobain, Springsteen and the other outstanding writers of their time, with all the rock and roll energy of the original versions.

This is rock in its full glory, celebrated by a generation that grew up with it, and a new generation experiencing it for the first time. The music is timeless; Rock Re-imagined.

http://chrysalisorchestra.com/

Recommended Albums #75

Steven Wilson: To the Bone (2017)

Prog god Steven Wilson (some of you want to stop reading right there but I implore you for your own sake to resist the urge) has created, on his fifth solo record, an homage to progressive pop records that captivated  him in his youth.

Echoes of ambitious works such as Peter Gabriel’s So, Tears for Fears’ Seeds of Love and works by Talk Talk and Kate Bush permeate a diverse collection that is more about songs than the album. It’s almost like ABBA meets David Bowie–and how awesome would that have been?

Wilson eschews complex time signatures and paints with brighter colors than on much of his past work. The possible risk? Losing a few of the hardcore proggers from his Porcupine Tree days. The probable reward? Growing his newly multi-gendered audience by throwing them more sonic thrills than challenges. Steven Wilson can make any kind of album he wants. He wanted to go pop-rock. And it’s glorious.

The slow-building “Nowhere Now” hearkens to Wilson’s work with Aviv Geffen in Blackfield, with its dark ruminations on ruination colliding with an uplifting harmony chorus.

“Pariah”, featuring guest vocals by Israeli singer Ninet Tayeb, ricochets between hope and hopelessness, determination and despair:

I’m tired of Facebook
Tired of my failing health
I’m tired of everyone
And that includes myself
Well being alone now
It doesn’t bother me
But not knowing if you are
That’s been hell you see

“The Same Asylum as Before” is simply a thrill ride and the best rock song I’ve heard this year, period. Falsetto vocals. An anthemic and cathartic chorus that may inspire you to explore your car’s volume dial limits. A searing, channel-panning metalesque solo that drops off a cliff into a quiet, almost jazz section…there’s a hell of a lot going on here. But this kind of ambition and dynamic interplay are the particular forte of the many-hatted Wilson. Guitar god, producer extraordinaire, songwriter par excellence…it’s amazing to think prog rock’s current leading light is actually getting better.

“Permanating” puts the exclamation point on Wilson’s foray from dark introspection to buoyant populism. It’s unapologetically joyful–a description I can’t believe I’m applying to Steven Wilson.

But hey, if Steven Wilson wants to make pop prog, or pop rock, or whatever you call this, he will. And he’ll do it better than virtually anyone else can.

 

Listen to: “Nowhere Now”

 

Listen to: “Pariah”

 

Don’t miss: “The Same Asylum as Before”

 

Listen to: “Permanating”

 

See also:

https://edcyphers.com/2016/03/09/songs-you-may-have-missed-574/

https://edcyphers.com/2014/08/10/songs-you-may-have-missed-513/

https://edcyphers.com/2013/10/04/songs-you-may-have-missed-483/

https://edcyphers.com/2013/02/11/songs-you-may-have-missed-329/

https://edcyphers.com/2012/11/14/songs-you-may-have-missed-236/

https://edcyphers.com/2012/10/01/recommended-albums-24-2/

https://edcyphers.com/2017/05/01/songs-you-may-have-missed-614/

Take a trip through music history with the Great 78 Project

By digitizing songs recorded on 78 rpm records from the 1890s to the 1950s, project preserves old music for future generations.

(via opensource.com) by Chris Hermanson

A few weeks ago, a friend sent me a link to the Great 78 Project, “a community project for the preservation, research, and discovery of 78 rpm records.” The project is supported by the Internet Archive, George Blood, and the Archive of Contemporary Music. Its purpose, first and foremost, is to convert old recordings into digital audio to preserve those historic performances for future listeners. Currently it’s working to digitize the 200,000 or so 78 rpm records it has collected, and it’s actively looking for contributions to add to its collection.

I think this is an exciting project that should be of interest to anyone who enjoys exploring music—and especially those involved in the open community. In this article, I’ll look at a few things you may want to know about the project…

Read more:

https://opensource.com/article/17/9/great-78-project

Previous Older Entries Next Newer Entries

%d bloggers like this: