Quora: Was Bob Dylan jealous of the mass appeal of the Beatles? (Part 2)

(via Quora) Written by Tony Sienzent

While I agree that Dylan was a restless artist following his own muse, there is no denying that he was totally captivated by The Beatles breakthrough hits in America, listening attentively to “I Want To Hold Your Hand” & “She Loves You (Yeah Yeah Yeah).”

Even though most of his purist folkie friends at Gerde’s Folk City club & The Gaslight & similar locations held their noses at this seemingly meaningless teenie-pop, with the exception of Roger McGuinn who went on to form the ‘American Beatles’ band The Byrds, Dylan privately said that The Beatles harmonies were outrageous & their chords made it all valid. He was very attentive & interested in the Beatlemania phenomena & resisted meeting them until Time Magazine gave him a cover, as they did The Beatles previously, so he would be accepted as an equal (and/or better)…

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Quora: Was Bob Dylan jealous of the mass appeal of the Beatles?

(via Quora) Written by Todd Lowry

Yes, Dylan was jealous of the Beatles.

Paul McCartney discovered Bob Dylan’s 1963 “Freewheelin’” album in 1964. All the Beatles had listened to it and it had inspired John and Paul to try writing deeper, more meaningful lyrics. John began by working on a new song called “I’m a Loser.”

In 1964, Dylan met the Beatles at the Delmonico Hotel in New York City. Within minutes of meeting each other, Dylan proceeded to get the Fab Four stoned for the first time on pot.

Dylan’s lyrics had inspired Lennon and McCartney to begin writing “deeper” songs such as “Norwegian Wood” and “Eleanor Rigby.”

Read more: https://www.quora.com/Was-Bob-Dylan-jealous-of-the-mass-appeal-of-the-Beatles

Bob Dylan Is Not a Fan of You Taking His Photo Onstage

© Provided by Penske Media Corporation 17th Annual Critics’ Choice Movie Awards – Show

(via msn entertainment) by Andy Greene

Bob Dylan has had a strict “no photos” policy at his concerts for years, but that’s rarely stopped fans from taking our their cellphones and trying to snap a few images before security swarms. But on Tuesday night at a show in Vienna, Austria, he finally reached his boiling point when he stopped singing “Blowin’ in the Wind” after one verse to admonish the audience.

“We can either play or pose,” he barked into the microphone according to multiple reports. “It’s your decision!”

Read more: https://www.msn.com/en-us/music/news/bob-dylan-is-not-a-fan-of-you-taking-his-photo-onstage/ar-BBW2EKb?ocid=spartanntp

Bob Dylan obliges annoying fan in Berkeley by actually playing ‘Free Bird’

(via SFGate)

You’ve seen that guy.

He emerges from some dark corner of the audience, maybe drunk, gawkily shoving his way through the crowd as the audience stands contented, mesmerized by the rock god onstage. He leans forward next to your ear, brutishly disturbing your daydream with a shrill, piercing shout:

“FREE BIRD!”

Eyes roll in the audience. The man’s face snarls with wretched delight. He is the only one laughing.

But just before your disgust impels you to jam your elbow into this troll’s ribcage, a guitar rings out. Everyone turns to the stage.

Holy hell, Bob Dylan is actually playing “Free Bird.”

To the shock of a Berkeley audience, Dylan closed out his set at the Greek Theater last week — which featured covers of some of Frank Sinatra’s most famous songs from his newest album “Fallen Angels” —  with a take on Lynyrd Skynyrd’s 1973 hit “Free Bird.”

Did You Ever Realize…

hootie

dylan

Videos of the Week: Bob Dylan’s IBM Ad…and its Parody

Bob Dylan’s IBM commercial (above) and the Funny or Die “Extended Edition” (below).

“Wagon Wheel”: Raiding Bob Dylan’s Wastebasket

old crow rucker

“Wagon Wheel” is a song with a very interesting story. It doesn’t sound like a typical 21st century country song. But it’s the kind of song 21st century country artists love to cover because it’s the kind modern country songwriters have so much trouble coming up with. Which is to say, it comes from a more instinctive place, taking the express track from the writer’s gut without that stop at the brain for mental market-testing.

whiskey river wagon wheel

“Wagon Wheel” sounds like the work of one of the great folk songwriters of the 20th century, say a Woody Guthrie or a Stephen Foster…because it is in fact the work of one of the great folk songwriters of the 20th century–at least in part. I direct you to Wikipedia for the story:

(The following reprinted from Wikipedia)

“Wagon Wheel” is a song originally sketched by Bob Dylan and later completed by Old Crow Medicine Show. Old Crow Medicine Show’s version was certified gold by the Recording Industry Association of America in November 2011.

“Wagon Wheel” is composed of two different parts. The chorus and melody for the song comes from a demo recorded by Bob Dylan during the Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid sessions. Although never officially released, the Dylan song was released on a bootleg and is usually named after the chorus and its refrain of “Rock Me Mama.” Although Dylan left the song an unfinished sketch, Ketch Secor of Old Crow Medicine Show wrote verses for the song around Dylan’s original chorus. Secor’s additional lyrics transformed “Rock Me Mama” into “Wagon Wheel.” Secor has stated the song is partially autobiographical. The song has become extremely popular since its inclusion on Old Crow Medicine Show’s major label debut, O.C.M.S. in 2004, although the song appeared in earlier form on the now out of print “Troubles Up and Down the Road” EP in 2001. Dylan’s song is often credited to “A. Crudup.”, and the official publishing information is Dylan/Secor.

Old Crow Medicine Show: “Wagon Wheel” (2004)

Dan Milliken, reviewing the song for Country Universe, gave it an A+ rating, calling it “one of country music’s all-time great sing-alongs”.

The song has since been covered by numerous artists, including: Darius Rucker, Chad Brownlee, The Menzingers, Nash Street, Great American Taxi, Against Me!, Stephen Kellogg and the Sixers, Chris Pureka, David McMillin, Jeremy McComb, Matt Andersen, Mumford & Sons, Bodega, Little Feat, Donegal X-Press, Pat Buzzard of Saving Jane, Little Big Town, and Samjack Boys. (Note: there are lots more versions besides.)

Darius Rucker joined Old Crow Medicine Show at the Grand Ole Opry July 6, 2012, “for a special rendition of ‘Wagon Wheel.’” The fans “went crazy over Rucker’s cover of the Old Crow Medicine Show hit,” setting the stage for his tweeted announcement: “Secret out after @opry perf. I recorded a version of ‘Wagon Wheel’ for my new record & @ladyantebellum sings on track.” The new album, True Believers, is his third solo project on Capitol Records. Rucker’s cover is the album’s second single.

Darius Rucker: “Wagon Wheel” (2012)

The song did not at first appeal to Rucker. “Somebody had played ‘Wagon Wheel’ for me years ago,” he says. “It was one of those things that I didn’t really get.” When the faculty band from his daughter’s high school performed it, though, it had a different effect. Relating the story . .

“So, I’m at my daughter’s high school talent show, and I’m sitting in the audience with my family. We were watching my daughter, and the faculty band gets up. It’s just the faculty from her school, and they play ‘Wagon Wheel.’ I’m sitting in the audience, and they get to the middle of the chorus, and I turned to my wife, and I go, ‘I’ve got to cut this song.’ I’m serious. This all happened in three-and-a-half minutes, four minutes, while they’re playing the song.”

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